Friend Friday: Joshua Sky

It was less than a year ago, at the Volume 32 Writers of the Future Gala and autograph session. I was there as a returning past winner, which meant I was out of the spotlight. I could simply enjoy the festivities, congratulate my V32 brothers and sisters, and meet people.

Yeah. Meet people. All these writers, predominantly introverts, and we’re supposed to spontaneously meet people. Why came up with this idea?

But then suddenly this guy starts asking me questions about the contest. And about short fiction. Really good questions.

And that’s how I met Joshua Sky, a real kindred spirit. Joshua is a screenwriter, as well as working other roles in Hollywood; but he has a real passion for short fiction, science fiction especially.

More than that, Joshua is fascinated with the history of the field, and the culture. He has the fortune (?) of living in Los Angeles. On the downside, that means long, frustrating commutes. On the upside, that means he can attend the famed Los Angeles Science Fantasy Society, where he has access to their fantastic archives… and also to some of their fantastic, famous members. For Joshua, that’s a true treasure trove.

And he has put his research (both there and elsewhere) into a project: interviews with science fiction authors for Omni Media. I was honored to be one of his interview subjects, and it was the best interview I have had so far. Joshua doesn’t just ask a stock set of questions. He makes a point to read some of the author’s best works as well as their bio and web sites, and then he creates unique questions for each author. It’s a very personal interview every time. Here are his interviews so far.

It’s a short list, but he’s adding to it. Keep an eye out for more.

But Joshua is more than a science fiction historian, he’s also a short fiction author. Two of his stories have appeared in Omni, and I expect we’ll see more and in more markets soon.

And he’s an essayist. The House Had Eyes falls on the edge between memoir and fiction. It’s a tribute to Ray Bradbury, and it perfectly captures the wistful nostalgia and sense of loss of a great Bradbury tale. This one’s special. I give it my highest recommendations.

So that’s my friend, Joshua Sky. I hope you enjoy his work!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *