The Year’s Top Short SF Novels selects “Murder on the Aldrin Express”

Now it can be told: AudioText, producers of fine audio books, has selected “Murder on the Aldrin Express” for volume 4 of The Year’s Top Short SF Novels. This is truly an honor! Their emphasis is mainly audio, but they also produce an ebook version of each volume.

To see what sort of company that puts me in, here are their past volumes:

  • The Year’s Top Short SF Novels: “Return to Titan,” by Stephen Baxter, is set in his Xeelee sequence. Michael Poole and his father search one of Saturn’s moons for sentient life that would interfere with their plans to build a gateway to the stars. In this year’s Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award winner for best short fiction, “The Sultan of the Clouds,” by Geoffrey A. Landis, a terraforming expert is inexplicably invited to Venus by the child who owns most of the planet’s habitable floating cities. “Seven Cities of Gold,” by David Moles, tells the story of a Japanese relief worker charged with tracking down the renegade Christian leader responsible for detonating a nuclear device in an Islam-occupied North American city. In “Jackie’s-Boy,” by Steven Popkes, an orphaned child befriends an uplifted elephant from the abandoned St. Louis Zoo as they trek south across a sparsely populated North America to find sanctuary. “A History of Terraforming,” by Robert Reed, involves a young boy’s ambition to take up his father’s work of terraforming Mars and then much of the solar system and discovers that much more than planets have been altered. In “Troika,” by Alastair Reynolds, the lone survivor of a mission that explored a massive alien object attempts to reveal what he discovered despite the wishes of the Second Soviet Union. Set in the author’s S’hdonni universe, “Several Items of Interest,” by Rick Wilber, the Earth ruling aliens ask a human collaborator to help quell a human insurrection led by the collaborator’s brother.
  • The Year’s Top Short SF Novels 2: In “The Ice Owl,” by Carolyn Ives Gilman, an adolescent, female, Waster in the iron city of Glory to God finds an enigmatic tutor who provides her with much more than academic instruction while a fundamentalist revolt is underway. In the HUGO AWARD winner, “The Man Who Bridged the Mist,” by Kij Johnson, an architect from the capital builds a bridge over a dangerous mist that will change more than just the Empire. In “Kiss Me Twice,” by Mary Robinette Kowal, a detective, with the assistance of the police department’s AI that takes on Mae West’s persona, solves a murder with all the flair of an Asimov robot story. “The Man Who Ended History: A Documentary,” by Ken Liu, is a moving chronicle of attempts to witness the history of Japanese atrocities against the Chinese in a World War II prison camp by traveling back in time using Bohm-Kirino particles. In “The Ants of Flanders,” by Robert Reed, a teenage boy, incapable of fear, takes center stage in an alien invasion of Earth that pits alien foes against each other in a war that has no regard for mankind’s existence. Finally, in “Angel of Europa,” by Allen M. Steele, an arbiter aboard a space ship, exploring the moons of Jupiter, is resuscitated from a hibernation tank to investigate the deaths of two scientists that took place in a bathyscaphe underneath the global ocean of Europa.
  • The Year’s Top Short SF Novels 3: In “In the House of Aryaman, a Lonely Signal Burns,” by Elizabeth Bear, Police Sub-Inspector Ferron investigates the murder of genetics engineer, Dexter Coffin, who has been turned inside out, in a cutting edge biomedical lab set in a not too distant future India. In Jay Lake‘s “The Stars Do Not Lie,” Morgan Abutti is soon in fear for his life when he tries to announce his discovery of something in the stars that contradicts the creation myth of a major religion on his planet. In “The Weight of History, the Lightness of the Future,” also by Jay Lake, set in the author’s “Sunspin” series, the Howard Immortal, Before Michaela Cannon, and an untrustworthy shipmind investigate the cause of the Mistake, an alien attack on human civilization with an EMP weapon that occurred more than a thousand years ago and wiped out most of its technology. In “Sudden, Broken and Unexpected,” by Steven Popkes, a burnt-out, talented musician is hired to help a world-class rock star divaloid, an electronic construct, prepare for her new world tour. There’s only one problem, the musician passionately despises divaloids. In Robert Reed‘s “Eater-of-Bone,” marooned human colonists, from the “Great Ship,” fight for dominance on a planet inhabited by smaller, weaker, and less intelligent aliens. Finally, in “The Boolean Gate,” by Walter Jon Williams, set in the 19th century, an elderly Samuel Clemens escapes his Mark Twain persona through his friendship with Nicola Tesla. As Tesla’s inventions come to fruition, Twain suspects that Tesla has opened up a gateway to an alien intelligence.

For those keeping track at home, that means this story will appear in two “best of” collections this year! To all of the people behind “Murder on the Aldrin Express”: thank you!

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